Low-Calorie Healthy Jjajangmyeon Black Bean Sauce Noodles

So, I LOVE shirataki noodles. At 10 calories a serving, there is really no better way to enjoy noodles without the guilt.

In case you don’t know what they are, here’s wikipedia:

Shirataki are thin, translucent, gelatinous traditional Japanese noodlesmade from the konjac yam (devil’s tongue yam or elephant yam).[1] The word “shirataki” means “white waterfall”, describing the appearance of these noodles. Largely composed of water and glucomannan, a water-soluble dietary fiber, they are very low in carbohydrates and calories, and have little flavor of their own.

Shirataki noodles can be found both in dry and soft “wet” forms in Asian markets and some supermarkets. When purchased wet, they are packaged in liquid. They normally have a shelf life of up to one year. Some brands may require rinsing or par-boiling as the water they are packaged in has an odor that may be unpleasant to those not accustomed to it.

Korean jja jang is the perfect sauce to add to these noodles, because they have a strong flavor that will sink into the noodles.

Usually people add starch to thicken up the sauce, but I chose not to, to save the calories… so just let it cook longer to thicken up!

Also, shirataki noodles don’t really taste like anything so make sure you let them sit in the sauce a while.

 

INGREDIENTS:

1 package of shirataki noodles
½ package of soft tofu, drained
1 cup of chopped celery
1 cup of zucchini, cut into ½ inch cubes
1 cup of red and yellow bell peppers
1 onion, chopped into chunks
¼ cup of black bean paste
1 teaspoon of sesame oil
½ a cucumber, cut into thin matchsticks for garnish
scallions, cut thinly for garnish
water

DIRECTIONS:

Add onion to pan and stir fry on medium heat until fragrant.
Add tofu, celery, peppers, and zucchini and keep stirring for about 5 minutes.
Clear a space in the center of the pan by pushing the ingredients to the edges.
Add add ¼ cup of black bean paste and stir it with a wooden spoon for 1 minute to fry it. Then mix everything in the pan and keep stirring.
Add 1 cup of water to the pan and let it cook with the lid closed for about 10 minutes.
Take off the lid and finish cooking for another 5 minutes on low, or until sauce is not too watery.
Rinse and drain shirataki noodles. Add to sauce, mix in the sesame oil and let sit for 15-20 minutes so the noodles can soak up the flavor.
Top with cucumbers and scallions.

Upcoming Segment on The Better Show!

As you all know, as an Asian woman, I am obsessed with my skin. But it’s not just about what you apply to the outside, it’s what you eat that nourishes the inside that really allows your skin to glow. That’s why I love this idea for my upcoming segment on the Better Show. How to eat, then treat.

I will be making a recipe that will be great for your skin, then making 3 masks (those recipes to come) that you can use for face, body and hair.

The dish is a Zucchini Fettucine Pesto that is inspired by Urban Remedy; they make all sorts of great dishes and juices and juice cleanses. The nutritionist there helped me come up with some good ideas, so thank you so much to Urban Remedy!!

Here you go!

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ZUCCHINI FETTUCINE PESTO
1 medium sized zucchini
2 tablespoons hemp seeds
1/2 teaspoon sea salt, plus more as needed
1 medium garlic clove, minced
1 cup packed fresh basil leaves (from about 1 large bunch)
1/4 cup packed fresh Italian parsley leaves
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Use a vegetable peeler to cut the zucchini into thin strips. Cut into fettucine noodles with knife.

In a food processor, combine hemp seeds, sea salt, garlic, basil and parsley and pulse until smooth. Scrape down the sides of the food processor with a rubber spatula.

Then, with the processor on, slowly add thin stream of olive oil until incorporated.

Top the zucchini noodles with your sauce and serve

Bacon Scallion Hummus Recipe for Fox & Friends

I’ll be on Fox and Friends chatting about tailgating recipes this Sunday!

I mean football plus bacon plus beer? COUNT ME IN.

 

Here is the recipe for Bacon & Chive hummus that I’ll be whipping up!

 

Bacon & Chive Hummus

Yield: 2 cups Prep Time: 15 min Cook Time: 10 min
Ingredients:

4 slices bacon
1 (15-oz.) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
1/3 cup tahini (sesame paste)
1 Tablespoon olive oil
2 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 garlic cloves, chopped
1/4 cup water
2 Tablespoons chopped chives
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon salt

Directions:

Set oven to 400 degrees and bake bacon for 15-18 minutes or until crispy.

In food processor, pulse together chickpeas, tahini, olive oil, lemon juice and chopped garlic until smooth.

Add the water, 3 slices of chopped bacon and 2 tablespoons chives. Pulse it a few more times until combined, and then season with salt and pepper.

Transfer the hummus to a serving dish and garnish with remaining chopped bacon and additional chives.

Tailgate Bruschetta Recipe

I had such a great time traveling from TX to AZ to CO!

I promised viewers this recipe on the air at NBC Arizona on Arizona Midday.

Here are Destry and me pulling a Kathie Lee and Hoda!
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ANd without further ado, the recipe!

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INGREDIENTS
  • 1 1/4 cup chopped arugula
  • 1 1/4 cup ricotta cheese
  • 1 loaf Italian bread, dut diagonally into 1-inch slices & lightly toasted
  • 1/2 tsp. Dijon mustard
  • 1/4 cup chopped, toasted walnuts
  • 2 tbsp. Pompeian Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 2 tbsp. Pompeian White Balsamic Vinegar
PREPARATION

Brush bread slices with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil.

In a small bowl, whisk together remaining 2 tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil, White Balsamic Vinegar, mustard and salt and pepper to taste. Drizzle half over arugula and toss well; set aside remaining dressing for another use.  Stir walnuts into arugula mixture.

Spread each slice of bread with 1 tablespoon ricotta, then top with 1 tablespoon arugula mixture.  Serve immediately.

Recipe: Gochujang Balsamic Viniagrette

So I have recently become a kale fanatic – I love the green leafy crisp texture and the nuttiness of the vegetable – I tend to blanch it before putting it in a salad because it is a little bitter.

I tweeted about the gochujang balsamic vinaigrette I used for my salad today, because, well, I’m Korean. And I love gochujang.

so this recipe is for @marianne2679

oh and for those of you who don’t know, gochujang is a korean red pepper paste that is tangy with a hint of sweetness.

Gochujang Balsamic Viniagrette

3 tbsps gochujang
2 tbsps whole grain dijon (I used Maille)
3 tbsps extra virgin olive oil
2 tbsps grated pecorino romano
salt and pepper to taste

Mix all the ingredients with a hand blender or fork or whatever is most convenient until it is all well combined.

Top your salad!

Recipe: Quinoa – a recipe and a realization

Quinoa. It started popping up all over appetizer and salad menus about 3 years ago. But I first came in contact with it six years ago because a Peruvian doctor at my mother’s practice told her it was a delicious super food. That’s when my mom started making it at home. Of course, my Korean mother pronounced it with a Korean twang, so I was afraid to say the word for a while. (Mom, don’t get mad)

Anyway, now that it’s ubiquitous, I eat it constantly. Being Asian, I also eat a lot of rice. So the idea dawned on me to make Japanese curry and serve it over quinoa instead of rice. I have to tell you, it’s lacking. Rice has a very specific chewy texture that I call the bounce-back factor. It kind of makes it feel like your teeth are bouncing off the rice grains. I know I sound crazy, but it’s a thing.

After that failed quinoa attempt, I didn’t try to substitute quinoa for rice again. Clearly, it was a traumatic experience.

However, I recently came upon some quinoa sushi handrolls at Sushi Samba. The rolls are not wrapped in seaweed, but rather, in soy paper. I don’t love the soy paper, but then again, if you are going to buy a quinoa handroll, you are likely not looking for a classic handroll.

The health nut in me was overjoyed by the opportunity to have a healthier hand roll. Eat rolls, don’t get rolls. I asked my dietician friend Jason Machowsky what he thought, since frankly I didn’t want to give you all a recipe that wasn’t as healthy as I thought.

Well, Jason told me,

“Quinoa is a great grain! It’s has one of the highest protein contents per serving of all the grains. It is a great source of fiber, some B-vitamins and a number of essential minerals. Despite its high nutrient content, quinoa also has a fair number of calories, with about 200 calories per cooked cup (the size of your fist). A little quinoa can go a long way.”

So now I can encourage you to make your own quinoa sushi handrolls and eat them too. If you don’t want to, head to Sushi Samba (yes, I know it was in Sex and the City and people think it’s just a scene. But I was pleasantly surprised. Hopefully, you will be, too.)

Now, as for the cooking, you can find pre-made eel sauce at most Asian markets, but I believe in making it from scratch. That said, if you want some shortcuts, just buy the pre-made eel, already sauced up.

Eel and Avocado Quinoa Hand Roll Recipe
INGREDIENTS:

• 2 slices freshwater eel, cooked (approximately 1.4 oz.)

• 0.2 oz. eel sauce (recipe below)

• 2 slices avocado, ripe/freshly sliced (approximately 0.7 oz.)

• 1.2 oz. red quinoa, cooked

• 1 piece soy paper (half cut)

EEL SAUCE INGREDIENTS:

• 1/2 cup soy sauce

• 1/2 cup white sugar

• 1/2 cup mirin (Japanese sweet wine)

• 2 tbsp. cornstarch

Heat soy sauce, sugar and mirin in a small saucepan over medium. Stir

until liquid is reduced to about 3/4 cup, add cornstarch until sauce thickens and

stir.

QUINOA INGREDIENTS:

• 1 cup red quinoa (100% organic)

• 2 cups water

Heat water with quinoa in a medium sized pan. Cover and keep heat on

high until water is boiling, then turn heat to medium until water is absorbed. Total

boiling time is roughly 15 minutes.

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Prepare to cut eel. Defrost the eel in its vacuum pack. Cut the eel in half lengthwise. Cut the cucumber into a piece that measures 1/8 – ¼ inch wide (sushi style).

2. Prepare avocado by cutting in half lengthwise. Twist the two halves until they separate. Cut the half into quarters. Cut off the ends, remove the skin and slice lengthwise into ¼ inch slices. Set the slices aside.

(You can include whatever else you’d like — scallion, carrot, zucchini, radish, magical jumping beans, butterbeer… etc. — to personalize your hand roll.)

3. Tear or cut the soy paper sheets in half. Hold a ½ sheet of soy paper with one side down in the palm of one hand.

4. Press quinoa into soy paper. Moisten your other hand with a little water and ball up the 1.2 oz. of prepared quinoa. Press it into the left side of the soy paper.

5. Lay vegetable filling and eel alongside quinoa. Tightly wrap the opposite right-hand edge around, using a folding and tucking method to create a cone shape with the filling on the inside.

6. Use a dab of quinoa on the corner to secure the inside edge of the soy paper to the outside of the cone.

7. Place on plate & garnish.

Superbowl Kobe Beef Sliders from Stanton Social (Recipe)

With Superbowl Sunday fast approaching, the renowned Stanton Social recently gave me a lesson in crafting their famous kobe beef sliders.
I will say, the flavors are pretty damn good. If you dont have a grill you can do it in a pan, but make sure you use chef Richie Pims’ technique is really piling on that cheesey goodness. YUM!

Kobe Mix:
• 1 lb. ground kobe beef
• 1 tB. soy sauce
• 1 tB. Worcestershire sauce
• 3 tB. butter, softened
• salt and pepper

Mix all of the ingredients together and then mold the burgers into 2.5oz patties. Place the patties on a sheet tray. Cover and chill.

Burger Sauce:
• ½ cup BBq sauce
• ¼ cup Ketchup
• ¼ cup Dijon mustard

Toppings:
• .5 lbs. cheddar cheese, grated
• Sliced tomato
• Sliced pickles

To finish:
1. Grill the top and the bottom of a 2 oz. slider bun.
2. Grill 1 2.5oz burger pattie over high heat. Mark one side and then flip the patty.
3. Top with 2 tB. of cheese and cook to preferred temperature (medium-rare is about 3 minutes on each side).
4. Place 1 slice of tomato on the bun with 1 slice of pickle.
5. Serve with a toothpick through the burger.

Check out the full piece at
http://www.ny1.com/content/154998/super-bowl-sliders-a-real-crowd-pleaser

and btw, GO GIANTS!!

Making NYC Street Meat: Chicken and Rice Recipe

Photo by Jason Lam

If you are a New Yorker… or know a New Yorker… or know someone who knows a New Yorker, you know about the best halal chicken and rice cart in the city. It’s on the corner of 53rd and 6th and on any given Friday or Saturday night, you may be stuck in line for 45 minutes waiting to get your $6 bite of heaven.

After being on my feet all evening, the sight of this line is enough to bring tears to my eyes. I just want my chicken and rice with the white sauce that tastes so good and so bad for you at the same time. This caused me to join forces with my good friend, fellow foodlover, and producer of new PBS documentary show Kimchi Chronicles Eric Rhee to embark on a quest to uncover the recipe for legit halal.

Now, there are a lot of wildcard factors with trying to recreate the ambrosia from that cart. First of all, their ingredients are not exactly high quality; I think they just clear the mark of safe-to-eat. We wanted to use high-quality and fresh ingredients. Secondly, the chicken seems to change day to day, ever so slightly, from the cart. Sometimes there are more spices in the meat, sometimes there are less. And then, there is of course, the question of the white sauce. It was our belief that it was a mixture meant to imitate the flavors of a good Greek yogurt-based sauce, without having to spend the money on the actual good yogurt.

So here is my qualifier: Our chicken recipe is not exactly what you get from that cart. In fact, it’s better. It makes the chicken from the cart seem over-salted, under-flavored and almost uninteresting.

Yes, that is a bold statement, but try this recipe and see. Our chicken was juicier, had more depth of flavor, and paired flawlessly with our fresh and delicious white sauce.

The best part? As long as you marinate a bunch and stick it in your freezer, you can make this in less than 45 minutes.

So we started by eating off the cart for a few days and compiling a list of ingredients we thought may be in the chicken, while also doing extensive googling. After 3 hours of clicking I was convinced that we should just go to Middle East and buy every spice we could find and then calculate all the different permutations of said spices. (Anyone wanna sponsor me on a trip?) Given the impossibility of that scenario, we compiled the following:

Possible Spices:
turmeric
cumin
coriander
cloves
garlic
paprika
curry powder
salt
pepper

We decided to also use Greek yogurt during the marination process. I strongly suggest this.

We did two combinations of these spices. Eaten side by side with the original off-the-cart halal, I can confidently say, our second rendition was the best. The meat was juicy, the flavors were balanced, it paired with the yellow rice and lettuce beautifully.

There were a couple tricks we pulled. First off, we used chicken thigh meat, which has higher fat content and is more flavorful. Secondly, we marinated our chicken for 24 hours. Lastly, Eric came up with a bangin’ white sauce recipe. I wanted to eat that white sauce on everything… from pita chips to cucumbers to off my fingers.

We were able to procure all of the ingredients from a NYC grocery store. If you live in Montana, it may be a little tough to get these, but if you are motivated to try, I suggest spiceplace.com.

So without further ado…

Chicken and Rice NYC Street Meat Style
By Eric Rhee and Michelle Won

6 chicken thighs, fat trimmed, cubed (you can use bone-in, but boneless will be easier to work with)
3/4 tsp turmeric
2 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp ground coriander
1/2 tsp ground cloves
3/4 tsp paprika
1/2 tsp curry powder
6 garlic cloves, minced
2 Tbsp lemon juice
3/4 cup greek yogurt
sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
3 tbsp olive oil
I large onion sliced lengthwise, thinly

Combine all the spices, garlic, lemon juice and 1 tablespoon of olive. Generously salt and pepper. Then work in the Greek yogurt. Add the cubed chicken thighs and onions and let it marinate overnight. You have the option of adding saffron as well, if you want your chicken a little more yellow and savory. Put 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a hot skillet. Add the chicken and onion mixture.

Heat and serve over yellow rice.

ER’s White Sauce
8-10 oz. Greek yogurt
1/2 c. mayonnaise
1 Tbsp. salt
1 Tbsp. white or red wine vinegar
1.5 Tbsp. lemon juice (½ lemon)
1 Tbsp. olive oil
3 garlic cloves, pureed
1-2 tsp dill (dry or fresh)
1 tbsp cold water

Mix all together and serve aside chicken and rice.

The perfect thing to watch while eating you new creation? Eric’s show: Kimchi Chronicles, starring celeb chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten, his wife Marja Vongerichten, Heather Graham and Hugh Jackman. You think that’s an unexpected group of people to talk about Korean food? You’ve got to watch it to see how genius it really is.

HELLOOO Cupcake! Wait No, Don’t Eat That…

The long-lived cupcake trend means little bitty delicious pastry treats priced anywhere between $4-8.
But you may want to think again before you shove that one in your mouth…

I haven’t done the research myself but frugal dad made up this nifty graphic…
worth a read.

…and btw, making them from scratch is SO much better no matter what.

food

Source: http://frugaldad.com